Ideas from 'The Myth of Sisyphus' by Albert Camus [1942], by Theme Structure

[found in 'The Myth of Sisyphus' by Camus,Albert (ed/tr O'Brien,Justin) [Penguin 1975,0-14-003935-x]].

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1. Philosophy / A. Wisdom / 1. Nature of Wisdom
Life will be lived better if it has no meaning
1. Philosophy / D. Nature of Philosophy / 3. Philosophy Defined
Suicide - whether life is worth living - is the one serious philosophical problem
1. Philosophy / D. Nature of Philosophy / 6. Despair over Philosophy
To an absurd mind reason is useless, and there is nothing beyond reason
5. Theory of Logic / A. Overview of Logic / 3. Value of Logic
Logic is easy, but what about logic to the point of death?
16. Persons / F. Free Will / 1. Free Will / a. Nature of free will
Whether we are free is uninteresting; we can only experience our freedom
16. Persons / F. Free Will / 2. Free Will Theories / a. Fate
The human heart has a tiresome tendency to label as fate only what crushes it
22. Metaethics / A. Ethical Ends / 8. Love
The more one loves the stronger the absurd grows
22. Metaethics / C. Sources of Ethics / 7. Particularism
Discussing ethics is pointless; moral people behave badly, and integrity doesn't need rules
23. Ethics / C. Virtue Theory / 2. Elements of Virtue Theory / c. Motivation for virtue
One can be virtuous through a whim
23. Ethics / F. Existentialism / 2. Nihilism
If we believe existence is absurd, this should dictate our conduct
Happiness and the absurd go together, each leading to the other
23. Ethics / F. Existentialism / 7. Existential Action
Essential problems either risk death, or intensify the passion of life
Danger and integrity are not in the leap of faith, but in remaining poised just before the leap
24. Applied Ethics / C. Death Issues / 4. Suicide
It is essential to die unreconciled and not of one's own free will