Ideas from 'Eudemian Ethics' by Aristotle [333 BCE], by Theme Structure

[found in 'Eudemian Ethics I,II and VIII' by Aristotle (ed/tr Woods,Michael) [OUP 1992,0-19-824020-1]].

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8. Modes of Existence / E. Nominalism / 1. Nominalism / b. Nominalism about universals
The thesis of the Form of the Good (or of anything else) is verbal and vacuous
10. Modality / C. Sources of Modality / 6. Necessity from Essence
The two right angles of a triangle necessitate that a quadrilateral has four
11. Knowledge Aims / A. Knowledge / 2. Understanding
Knowing is having knowledge; understanding is using knowledge
15. Nature of Minds / C. Capacities of Minds / 1. Faculties
Whether the mind has parts is irrelevant, since it obviously has distinct capacities
16. Persons / F. Free Will / 3. Constraints on the will
A man is the cause of what is within his power, and what he causes is in his power
16. Persons / F. Free Will / 4. For Free Will
Only a human being can be a starting point for an action
18. Thought / A. Modes of Thought / 3. Emotions
Some emotional states are too strong for human nature
20. Action / C. Motives for Action / 2. Acting on Beliefs / a. Acting on beliefs
Choice results when deliberation brings together an opinion with an inclination
20. Action / C. Motives for Action / 3. Acting on Reason / a. Practical reason
Unlike in inanimate things, in animate things actions have more than one starting point
The deliberative part of the soul discerns explanatory causes
20. Action / C. Motives for Action / 4. Responsibility for Actions
An action is voluntary when it is accompanied by thought of some kind
22. Metaethics / A. Value / 1. Nature of Value / f. Ultimate value
No one would choose life just for activities not done for their own sake
22. Metaethics / A. Value / 2. Values / c. Health
Everything seeks, not a single good, but its own separate good
22. Metaethics / B. The Good / 1. Goodness / g. Consequentialism
We judge people from their deeds because we cannot see their choices (which matter more)
22. Metaethics / B. The Good / 2. Happiness / a. Nature of happiness
Horses, birds and fish are not happy, lacking a divine aspect to their natures
22. Metaethics / B. The Good / 2. Happiness / d. Routes to happiness
Happiness involves three things, of which the greatest is either wisdom, virtue, or pleasure
22. Metaethics / C. Ethics Foundations / 1. Nature of Ethics / g. Moral responsibility
Acts are voluntary if done knowingly, by the agent, and in his power to avoid it
22. Metaethics / C. Ethics Foundations / 2. Source of Ethics / e. Human nature
What is natural for us is either there at birth, or appears by normal processes
23. Ethics / C. Virtue Theory / 1. Virtue Theory / a. Nature of virtue
Virtue is different from continence
23. Ethics / C. Virtue Theory / 1. Virtue Theory / b. Basis of virtue
Excellence is the best state of anything (like a cloak) which has an employment or function
23. Ethics / C. Virtue Theory / 2. Elements of Virtue Theory / e. Character
Character (éthos) is developed from habit (ethos)
Character virtues (such as courage) are of the non-rational part, which follows the rational part
Character is shown by what is or is not enjoyed, and virtue chooses the mean among them
We judge character not by their actions, but by their reasons for actions
23. Ethics / C. Virtue Theory / 4. External Goods / a. External goods
Goods in the soul are more worthy than those outside it, as everybody wants them
26. Natural Theory / A. Speculations on Nature / 2. Natural Purpose / b. Limited purposes
It is folly not to order one's life around some end
26. Natural Theory / A. Speculations on Nature / 2. Natural Purpose / c. Purpose denied
Eyes could be used for a natural purpose, or for unnatural seeing, or for a non-seeing activity
26. Natural Theory / A. Speculations on Nature / 3. Natural Function
Each thing's function is its end