Ideas from 'Nature and Observability of Causal Relations' by Curt Ducasse [1926], by Theme Structure

[found in 'Causation' (ed/tr Sosa,E. /Tooley,M.) [OUP 1993,0-19-875094-3]].

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2. Reason / D. Definition / 2. Aims of Definition
A correct definition is what can be substituted without loss of meaning
26. Natural Theory / C. Causation / 1. Causation / b. Types of cause
Causation is defined in terms of a single sequence, and constant conjunction is no part of it
26. Natural Theory / C. Causation / 2. Particular Causation / a. Observation of causation
We see what is in common between causes to assign names to them, not to perceive them
26. Natural Theory / C. Causation / 2. Particular Causation / c. Conditions of causation
Causes are either sufficient, or necessary, or necessitated, or contingent upon
When a brick and a canary-song hit a window, we ignore the canary if we are interested in the breakage
26. Natural Theory / C. Causation / 2. Particular Causation / d. Selecting the cause
A cause is a change which occurs close to the effect and just before it
26. Natural Theory / C. Causation / 3. General Causation / a. Constant conjunction
Recurrence is only relevant to the meaning of law, not to the meaning of cause
26. Natural Theory / C. Causation / 3. General Causation / b. Nomological causation
We are interested in generalising about causes and effects purely for practical purposes