Ideas from 'Gorgias' by Plato [387 BCE], by Theme Structure

[found in 'Complete Works' by Plato (ed/tr Cooper,John M.) [Hackett 1997,0-87220-349-2]].

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1. Philosophy / D. Nature of Philosophy / 6. Despair over Philosophy
Is a gifted philosopher unmanly if he avoids the strife of the communal world?
2. Reason / C. Styles of Reason / 2. Elenchus
In "Gorgias" Socrates is confident that his 'elenchus' will decide moral truth
We should test one another, by asking and answering questions
19. Language / F. Communication / 1. Rhetoric
Rhetoric is irrational about its means and its ends
Rhetoric can produce conviction, but not educate people about right and wrong
20. Action / B. Preliminaries of Action / 1. Intention to Act / b. Types of intention
All activity aims at the good
22. Metaethics / A. Value / 2. Values / d. Fine deeds
A good person is bound to act well, and this brings happiness
22. Metaethics / A. Value / 2. Values / e. Self interest
Is it natural to simply indulge our selfish desires?
22. Metaethics / B. The Good / 1. Goodness / f. Good as pleasure
In slaking our thirst the goodness of the action and the pleasure are clearly separate
Good should be the aim of pleasant activity, not the other way round
22. Metaethics / B. The Good / 3. Pleasure / e. Role of pleasure
Good and bad people seem to experience equal amounts of pleasure and pain
22. Metaethics / B. The Good / 3. Pleasure / f. Dangers of pleasure
In a fool's mind desire is like a leaky jar, insatiable in its desires, and order and contentment are better
If happiness is the satisfaction of desires, then a life of scratching itches should be happiness
22. Metaethics / C. Ethics Foundations / 2. Source of Ethics / g. Will to power
Moral rules are made by the weak members of humanity
23. Ethics / A. Egoism / 2. Hedonism
Is the happiest state one of sensual, self-indulgent freedom?
23. Ethics / C. Virtue Theory / 2. Elements of Virtue Theory / c. Motivation for virtue
Should we avoid evil because it will bring us bad consequences?
23. Ethics / C. Virtue Theory / 2. Elements of Virtue Theory / e. Character
I would rather be a victim of crime than a criminal
23. Ethics / C. Virtue Theory / 3. Virtues / b. Temperance
If absence of desire is happiness, then nothing is happier than a stone or a corpse
Self-indulgent desire makes friendship impossible, because it makes a person incapable of co-operation
23. Ethics / C. Virtue Theory / 3. Virtues / c. Justice
A criminal is worse off if he avoids punishment
Do most people praise self-discipline and justice because they are too timid to gain their own pleasure?
23. Ethics / C. Virtue Theory / 4. External Goods / b. Health
The popular view is that health is first, good looks second, and honest wealth third
25. Society / B. The State / 1. Purpose of a State
As with other things, a good state is organised and orderly
25. Society / C. Political Doctrines / 5. Democracy / c. Direct democracy
A good citizen won't be passive, but will redirect the needs of the state
25. Society / D. Social Rights / 3. Social Equality / a. Grounds of equality
Do most people like equality because they are second-rate?
25. Society / D. Social Rights / 3. Social Equality / d. Economic equality
Does nature imply that it is right for better people to have greater benefits?