Ideas from 'Theories of Truth: a Critical Introduction' by Richard L. Kirkham [1992], by Theme Structure

[found in 'Theories of Truth: a Critical Introduction' by Kirkham,Richard L. [MIT 1995,0-262-61108-2]].

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3. Truth / A. Truth Problems / 5. Truth Bearers
There are at least fourteen candidates for truth-bearers
3. Truth / F. Semantic Truth / 1. Tarski's Truth / a. Tarski's truth definition
Tarski has to avoid stating how truths relate to states of affairs
3. Truth / F. Semantic Truth / 1. Tarski's Truth / b. Satisfaction and truth
For physicalism, reduce truth to satisfaction, then define satisfaction as physical-plus-logic
Insight: don't use truth, use a property which can be compositional in complex quantified sentence
A 'sequence' of objects is an order set of them
If one sequence satisfies a sentence, they all do
3. Truth / F. Semantic Truth / 2. Semantic Truth
If we define truth by listing the satisfactions, the supply of predicates must be finite
5. Theory of Logic / A. Overview of Logic / 5. First-Order Logic
In quantified language the components of complex sentences may not be sentences
5. Theory of Logic / F. Referring in Logic / 1. Naming / f. Names eliminated
We might do without names, by converting them into predicates
5. Theory of Logic / I. Semantics of Logic / 4. Satisfaction
An open sentence is satisfied if the object possess that property
7. Existence / D. Theories of Reality / 7. Facts / b. Types of fact
Why can there not be disjunctive, conditional and negative facts?