Ideas from 'Primitive Thisness and Primitive Identity' by Robert Merrihew Adams [1979], by Theme Structure

[found in 'Journal of Philosophy' (ed/tr -) [- ,]].

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9. Objects / A. Existence of Objects / 4. Individuation / d. Individuation by haecceity
A 'thisness' is a thing's property of being identical with itself (not the possession of self-identity)
There are cases where mere qualities would not ensure an intrinsic identity
9. Objects / D. Essence of Objects / 9. Essence and Properties
Essences are taken to be qualitative properties
9. Objects / F. Identity among Objects / 7. Indiscernible Objects
Black's two globes might be one globe in highly curved space
If the universe was cyclical, totally indiscernible events might occur from time to time
Two events might be indiscernible yet distinct, if there was a universe cyclical in time
10. Modality / E. Possible worlds / 2. Nature of Possible Worlds / a. Nature of possible worlds
Are possible worlds just qualities, or do they include primitive identities as well?
10. Modality / E. Possible worlds / 2. Nature of Possible Worlds / b. Worlds as fictions
Possible worlds are world-stories, maximal descriptions of whole non-existent worlds
10. Modality / E. Possible worlds / 3. Transworld Objects / d. Haecceitism
Adams says anti-haecceitism reduces all thisness to suchness
Haecceitism may or may not involve some logical connection to essence
Moderate Haecceitism says transworld identities are primitive, but connected to qualities
19. Language / C. Reference / 3. Direct Reference / a. Direct reference
Direct reference is by proper names, or indexicals, or referential uses of descriptions