Ideas from 'Existence and Quantification' by Willard Quine [1966], by Theme Structure

[found in 'Ontological Relativity and Other Essays' by Quine,Willard [Columbia 1969,0-231-08357-2]].

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4. Formal Logic / D. Modal Logic ML / 1. Modal Logic
Quine says quantified modal logic creates nonsense, bad ontology, and false essentialism [Melia]
5. Theory of Logic / A. Overview of Logic / 7. Second-Order Logic
Various strategies try to deal with the ontological commitments of second-order logic [Hale/Wright]
7. Existence / A. Nature of Existence / 3. Being / b. Being and existence
Philosophers tend to distinguish broad 'being' from narrower 'existence' - but I reject that
7. Existence / A. Nature of Existence / 7. Criterion for Existence
All we have of general existence is what existential quantifiers express
7. Existence / D. Theories of Reality / 10. Ontological Commitment / b. Commitment of quantifiers
Existence is implied by the quantifiers, not by the constants
7. Existence / D. Theories of Reality / 10. Ontological Commitment / c. Commitment of predicates
Theories are committed to objects of which some of its predicates must be true
7. Existence / D. Theories of Reality / 10. Ontological Commitment / d. Commitment of theories
Express a theory in first-order predicate logic; its ontology is the types of bound variable needed for truth [Lowe]
Ontological commitment of theories only arise if they are classically quantified
7. Existence / D. Theories of Reality / 10. Ontological Commitment / e. Ontological commitment problems
You can be implicitly committed to something without quantifying over it [Thomasson]
7. Existence / E. Categories / 1. Categories
In formal terms, a category is the range of some style of variables