Ideas from 'fragments/reports' by Anaximander [570 BCE], by Theme Structure

[found in 'Early Greek Phil II: first Ionians' by Anaximander (ed/tr Laks,A/Most,G) [Harvard Loeb 2016,978-0-674-99689-2]].

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1. Philosophy / C. History of Philosophy / 2. Ancient Philosophy / b. Pre-Socratic philosophy
Anaximander produced the first philosophy book (and maybe the first book)
                        Full Idea: Anaximander was the first to produce a philosophical book (later conventionally titled 'On Nature'), if not the first to produce a book at all.
                        From: report of Anaximander (fragments/reports [c.570 BCE]) by István Bodnár - Anaximander
                        A reaction: Wow! Presumably there were Egyptian 'books', but this still sounds like a stupendous claim to fame.
2. Reason / B. Laws of Thought / 2. Sufficient Reason
The earth is stationary, because it is in the centre, and has no more reason to move one way than another
                        Full Idea: Something which is established in the centre and has equality in relation to the extremes has no more reason to move up than it has down or to the sides (so the earth is stationary)
                        From: report of Anaximander (fragments/reports [c.570 BCE], A26) by Aristotle - On the Heavens 295b11
7. Existence / A. Nature of Existence / 1. Nature of Existence
Anaximander saw the contradiction in the world - that its own qualities destroy it
                        Full Idea: Anaximander discovers the contradictory character of our world: it perishes from its own qualities.
                        From: report of Anaximander (fragments/reports [c.570 BCE]) by Friedrich Nietzsche - Unpublished Writings 1872-74 19 [239]
                        A reaction: A lovely gloss on Anaximander, though I am not sure that I understand what Nietzsche means.
26. Natural Theory / A. Speculations on Nature / 6. Early Matter Theories / d. The unlimited
The Boundless cannot exist on its own, and must have something contrary to it
                        Full Idea: Those thinkers are in error who postulate ...a single matter, for this cannot exist without some 'perceptible contrariety': this Boundless, which they identify with the 'original real', must be either light or heavy, either hot or cold.
                        From: comment on Anaximander (fragments/reports [c.570 BCE]) by Aristotle - Coming-to-be and Passing-away (Gen/Corr) 329a10
                        A reaction: A dubious objection, I would say. If there has to be a contrasting cold thing to any hot thing, what happens when the cold thing is removed?
Anaximander introduced the idea that the first principle and element of things was the Boundless
                        Full Idea: Anaximander said that the first principle and element of existing things was the boundless; it was he who originally introduced this name for the first principle.
                        From: report of Anaximander (fragments/reports [c.570 BCE], A09) by Simplicius - On Aristotle's 'Physics' 9.24.14-
                        A reaction: Simplicius is quoting Theophrastus
Things begin and end in the Unlimited, and are balanced over time according to justice
                        Full Idea: The non-limited is the original material of existing things; their source is also that to which they return after destruction, according to necessity; they give justice and make reparation to each other for injustice, according to the arrangement of Time.
                        From: Anaximander (fragments/reports [c.570 BCE], B1), quoted by Simplicius - On Aristotle's 'Physics' 24.13-
                        A reaction: Simplicius is quoting Theophrastus
The essential nature, whatever it is, of the non-limited is everlasting and ageless
                        Full Idea: The essential nature, whatever it is, of the non-limited is everlasting and ageless.
                        From: Anaximander (fragments/reports [c.570 BCE], B2), quoted by (who?) - where?
27. Natural Reality / E. Cosmology / 2. Eternal Universe
The parts of all things are susceptible to change, but the whole is unchangeable
                        Full Idea: The parts of all things are susceptible to change, but the whole is unchangeable.
                        From: report of Anaximander (fragments/reports [c.570 BCE]) by Diogenes Laertius - Lives of Eminent Philosophers 02.An.2