Ideas from 'Truth' by Peter F. Strawson [1950], by Theme Structure

[found in 'The Nature of Truth' (ed/tr Lynch, Michael P.) [MIT 2001,0-262-62145-2]].

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3. Truth / C. Correspondence Truth / 2. Correspondence to Facts
The fact which is stated by a true sentence is not something in the world
                        Full Idea: The fact which is stated by a true sentence is not something in the world.
                        From: Peter F. Strawson (Truth [1950], 2)
                        A reaction: Everything is in the world. This may just be a quibble over how we should use the word 'fact'. At some point the substance of what is stated in a sentence must eventually be out there, or we would never act on what we say.
Facts aren't exactly true statements, but they are what those statements say
                        Full Idea: Facts are what statements (when true) state; they are not what statements are about. ..But it would be wrong to identify 'fact' and 'true statement' for these expressions have different roles in our language.
                        From: Peter F. Strawson (Truth [1950], 2)
                        A reaction: Personally I like to reserve the word 'facts' for what is out there, independent of any human thought or speech. As a realist, I believe that the facts are quite independent of our attempts to understand the facts. True statements attempt to state facts.
3. Truth / F. Semantic Truth / 1. Tarski's Truth / a. Tarski's truth definition
The statement that it is raining perfectly fits the fact that it is raining
                        Full Idea: What could fit more perfectly the fact that it is raining than the statement that it is raining?
                        From: Peter F. Strawson (Truth [1950], 2)
3. Truth / F. Semantic Truth / 2. Semantic Truth
The word 'true' always refers to a possible statement
                        Full Idea: It is of prime importance to distinguish the fact that the use of 'true' always glances backwards or forwards to the actual or envisaged making of a statement by someone.
                        From: Peter F. Strawson (Truth [1950], 1)
                        A reaction: 'The truth of this matter will never be known'. Strawson is largely right, but it is crazy for any philosopher to use the word 'always' if they can possibly avoid it.