Combining Texts

All the ideas for 'Difference and Repetition', 'Politics' and 'fragments/reports'

expand these ideas     |    start again     |     specify just one area for these texts


122 ideas

1. Philosophy / D. Nature of Philosophy / 5. Aims of Philosophy / a. Philosophy as worldly
Free and great-souled men do not keep asking "what is the use of it?" [Aristotle]
1. Philosophy / F. Analytic Philosophy / 1. Nature of Analysis
Our method of inquiry is to examine the smallest parts that make up the whole [Aristotle]
1. Philosophy / H. Continental Philosophy / 1. Continental Philosophy
'Difference' refers to that which eludes capture [Deleuze, by May]
2. Reason / A. Nature of Reason / 2. Logos
Human beings, alone of the animals, have logos [Aristotle]
2. Reason / A. Nature of Reason / 4. Aims of Reason
Reasoning distinguishes what is beneficial, and hence what is right [Aristotle]
2. Reason / A. Nature of Reason / 7. Status of Reason
Intelligence which looks ahead is a natural master, while bodily strength is a natural slave [Aristotle]
2. Reason / F. Fallacies / 3. Question Begging
Men are natural leaders (apart from the unnatural ones) [Aristotle]
2. Reason / F. Fallacies / 5. Fallacy of Composition
'If each is small, so too are all' is in one way false, for the whole composed of all is not small [Aristotle]
7. Existence / A. Nature of Existence / 3. Being / a. Nature of Being
'Being' is univocal, but its subject matter is actually 'difference' [Deleuze]
Ontology can be continual creation, not to know being, but to probe the unknowable [Deleuze]
7. Existence / A. Nature of Existence / 3. Being / i. Deflating being
Ontology does not tell what there is; it is just a strange adventure [Deleuze, by May]
Being is a problem to be engaged, not solved, and needs a new mode of thinking [Deleuze, by May]
9. Objects / C. Structure of Objects / 8. Parts of Objects / c. Wholes from parts
The whole is prior to its parts, because parts are defined by their role [Aristotle]
11. Knowledge Aims / A. Knowledge / 2. Understanding
Understanding is the aim of our nature [Aristotle]
14. Science / D. Explanation / 2. Types of Explanation / g. Causal explanations
To grasp something, trace it back to its natural origins [Aristotle]
14. Science / D. Explanation / 2. Types of Explanation / k. Explanations by essence
The nature of each thing is its mature state [Aristotle]
16. Persons / B. Nature of the Self / 4. Presupposition of Self
The nature of all animate things is to have one part which rules it [Aristotle]
19. Language / F. Communication / 1. Rhetoric
Rhetoric now enables good speakers to become popular leaders [Aristotle]
20. Action / B. Preliminaries of Action / 2. Willed Action / d. Weakness of will
A community can lack self-control [Aristotle]
21. Aesthetics / A. Aesthetic Experience / 5. Natural Beauty
Nothing contrary to nature is beautiful [Aristotle]
21. Aesthetics / C. Artistic Issues / 5. Objectivism in Art
The collective judgement of many people on art is better than that of an individual [Aristotle]
22. Metaethics / A. Value / 2. Values / e. Love
Spirit [thumos] is the capacity by which we love [Aristotle]
22. Metaethics / A. Value / 2. Values / g. Self interest
Selfishness is wrong not because it is self-love, but because it is excessive [Aristotle]
22. Metaethics / B. The Good / 1. Goodness / g. Consequentialism
The function of good men is to confer benefits [Aristotle]
22. Metaethics / C. Ethics Foundations / 2. Source of Ethics / j. Ethics by convention
Some say slavery is unnatural and created by convention, and is therefore forced, and unjust [Aristotle]
23. Ethics / C. Virtue Theory / 2. Elements of Virtue Theory / c. Motivation for virtue
Virtuous people are like the citizens of the best city [Aristotle]
People become good because of nature, habit and reason [Aristotle]
23. Ethics / C. Virtue Theory / 2. Elements of Virtue Theory / d. Teaching virtue
Music can mould the character to be virtuous (just as gymnastics trains the body) [Aristotle]
23. Ethics / C. Virtue Theory / 2. Elements of Virtue Theory / f. The Mean
The law is the mean [Aristotle]
23. Ethics / C. Virtue Theory / 2. Elements of Virtue Theory / h. Right feelings
Virtue is concerned with correct feelings [Aristotle]
23. Ethics / C. Virtue Theory / 3. Virtues / b. Temperance
It is quite possible to live a moderate life and yet be miserable [Aristotle]
23. Ethics / C. Virtue Theory / 3. Virtues / c. Justice
Justice is a virtue of communities [Aristotle]
23. Ethics / C. Virtue Theory / 4. External Goods / c. Wealth
The rich are seen as noble, because they don't need to commit crimes [Aristotle]
23. Ethics / C. Virtue Theory / 4. External Goods / d. Friendship
Master and slave can have friendship through common interests [Aristotle]
24. Applied Ethics / C. Death Issues / 3. Abortion
Abortions should be procured before the embryo has acquired life and sensation [Aristotle]
25. Society / A. State of Nature / 1. A People / a. Human distinctiveness
Man is by nature a political animal [Aristotle]
People want to live together, even when they don't want mutual help [Aristotle]
Only humans have reason [Aristotle]
25. Society / A. State of Nature / 1. A People / c. A unified people
People who are anti-social or wholly self-sufficient are no part of a city [Aristotle]
A city can't become entirely one, because its very nature is to be a multitude [Aristotle]
Friendship is best good for cities, because it reduces factions [Aristotle]
The community (of villages) becomes a city when it is totally self-sufficient [Aristotle]
A community should all share to some extent in something like land or food [Aristotle]
A community must share a common view of good and justice [Aristotle]
25. Society / B. The State / 1. Purpose of a State
The same four cardinal virtues which apply to individuals also apply to a city [Aristotle]
Every state is an association formed for some good purpose [Aristotle]
A city aims at living well [Aristotle]
What is the best life for everyone, and is that a communal or an individual problem? [Aristotle]
The happiest city is the one that acts most nobly [Aristotle]
25. Society / B. The State / 2. State Legitimacy / e. General will
The state aims to consist as far as possible of those who are like and equal [Aristotle]
25. Society / B. The State / 3. Constitutions
The best constitution enables everyone to live the best life [Aristotle]
We must decide the most desirable human life before designing a constitution [Aristotle]
A city is a community of free people, and the constitution should aim at the common advantage [Aristotle]
The six constitutions are monarchy/tyranny, aristocracy/oligarchy, and polity/democracy [Aristotle]
Constitutions specify distribution of offices, the authorities, and the community's aim [Aristotle]
The greed of the rich is more destructive than the greed of the people [Aristotle]
Any constitution can be made to last for a day or two [Aristotle]
25. Society / B. The State / 4. Citizenship
A citizen is someone who is allowed to hold official posts in a city [Aristotle]
The middle classes are neither ambitious nor anarchic, which is good [Aristotle]
The virtues of a good citizen are relative to a particular constitution [Aristotle]
A person can be an excellent citizen without being an excellent man [Aristotle]
25. Society / B. The State / 5. Leaders / b. Monarchy
Kings should be selected according to character [Aristotle]
25. Society / B. The State / 5. Leaders / d. Elites
The guardians should not be harsh to strangers, as no one should behave like that [Aristotle]
The rich can claim to rule, because of land ownership, and being more trustworthy [Aristotle]
The only virtue special to a ruler is practical wisdom [Aristotle]
People who buy public office will probably expect to profit from it [Aristotle]
25. Society / B. The State / 6. Government / c. Executive
Officers should like the constitution, be capable, and have appropriate virtues and justice [Aristotle]
Election of officials by the elected is dangerous, because factions can control it [Aristotle]
In large communities it is better if more people participate in the offices [Aristotle]
25. Society / B. The State / 8. Religion in Society
The whole state should pay for the worship of the gods [Aristotle]
25. Society / B. The State / 9. Population / a. State population
The size of a city is decided by the maximum self-sufficient community that can be surveyed [Aristotle]
25. Society / C. Social Justice / 1. Social Justice
Justice is the order in a political community [Aristotle]
Justice is equality for equals, and inequality for unequals [Aristotle]
The good is obviously justice, which benefits the whole community, and involves equality in some sense [Aristotle]
The virtue of justice may be relative to a particular constitution [Aristotle]
25. Society / C. Social Justice / 3. Social Freedom / a. Slavery
Natural slaves are those naturally belonging to another, or who can manage no more than labouring [Aristotle]
25. Society / C. Social Justice / 3. Social Freedom / e. Freedom of lifestyle
One principle of liberty is to take turns ruling and being ruled [Aristotle]
25. Society / C. Social Justice / 4. Social Equality / a. Grounds of equality
We can claim an equal right to aristocratic virtue, as well as to wealth or freedom [Aristotle]
Equality is obviously there to help people who do not get priority in the constitution [Aristotle]
It is always the weak who want justice and equality, not the strong [Aristotle]
25. Society / C. Social Justice / 4. Social Equality / b. Political equality
The Heraeans replaced election with lot, to thwart campaigning [Aristotle]
Faction is for inferiors to be equal, and equals to become superior [Aristotle]
It is dreadful to neither give a share nor receive a share [Aristotle]
25. Society / C. Social Justice / 4. Social Equality / d. Economic equality
Phaleas proposed equality of property, provided there is equality of education [Aristotle]
Wealth could be quickly leveled by only the rich giving marriage dowries [Aristotle]
25. Society / C. Social Justice / 5. Legal Rights / a. Basis of rights
Law is intelligence without appetite [Aristotle]
25. Society / C. Social Justice / 5. Legal Rights / c. Property rights
Property should be owned privately, but used communally [Aristotle]
25. Society / D. Political Doctrines / 5. Democracy / a. Nature of democracy
Ultimate democracy is tyranny [Aristotle]
Like water, large numbers of people are harder to corrupt than a few [Aristotle]
In many cases, the claim that the majority is superior would apply equally to wild beasts [Aristotle]
Choosing officials by lot is democratic [Aristotle]
Popular leaders only arise in democracies that are not in accord with the law [Aristotle]
The many may add up to something good, even if they are inferior as individuals [Aristotle]
Democracy arises when people who are given equal freedom assume unconditional equality [Aristotle]
25. Society / D. Political Doctrines / 5. Democracy / d. Representative democracy
No office is permanent in a democracy [Aristotle]
If the people are equal in nature, then they should all share in ruling [Aristotle]
It is wrong that a worthy officer of state should seek the office [Aristotle]
25. Society / D. Political Doctrines / 6. Liberalism
We aim to understand the best possible community for free people [Aristotle]
25. Society / D. Political Doctrines / 7. Communitarianism
The best communities rely on a large and strong middle class [Aristotle]
Community is based on friends, who are equal and similar, and share things [Aristotle]
Look at all of the citizens before judging a city to be happy [Aristotle]
Citizens do not just own themselves, but are also parts of the city [Aristotle]
25. Society / D. Political Doctrines / 8. Socialism
People care less about what is communal, and more about what is their own [Aristotle]
25. Society / D. Political Doctrines / 9. Communism
Owning and sharing property communally increases disagreements [Aristotle]
There could be private land and public crops, or public land and private crops, or both public [Aristotle]
25. Society / D. Political Doctrines / 12. Feminism
Both women and children should be educated, as this contributes to a city's excellence [Aristotle]
25. Society / E. State Functions / 1. The Law / a. Legal system
Laws that match people's habits are more effective than mere written rules [Aristotle]
Man is the worst of all animals when divorced from law and justice [Aristotle]
If it is easy to change the laws, that makes them weaker [Aristotle]
25. Society / E. State Functions / 1. The Law / b. Rule of law
It is preferable that law should rule rather than any single citizen [Aristotle]
It is said that we should not stick strictly to written law, as it is too vague [Aristotle]
Correct law should be in control, with rulers only deciding uncertain issues [Aristotle]
25. Society / E. State Functions / 4. Education / a. Education principles
Learned men gain more in one day than others do in a lifetime [Posidonius]
25. Society / E. State Functions / 4. Education / b. Aims of education
A state is plural, and needs education to make it a community [Aristotle]
A city has a single end, so education must focus on that, and be communal, not private [Aristotle]
The aim of serious childhood play is the amusement of the complete adult [Aristotle]
25. Society / E. State Functions / 4. Education / c. Teaching
Men learn partly by habit, and partly by listening [Aristotle]
26. Natural Theory / A. Speculations on Nature / 2. Natural Purpose / a. Final purpose
If nature makes everything for a purpose, then plants and animals must have been made for man [Aristotle]
26. Natural Theory / A. Speculations on Nature / 2. Natural Purpose / b. Limited purposes
The best instruments have one purpose, not many [Aristotle]
27. Natural Reality / C. Space-Time / 2. Time / i. Time and change
Time is an interval of motion, or the measure of speed [Posidonius, by Stobaeus]
28. God / A. Divine Nature / 2. Divine Nature
God is not blessed and happy because of external goods, but because of his own nature [Aristotle]
28. God / C. Attitudes to God / 4. God Reflects Humanity
Men imagine gods to be of human shape, with a human lifestyle [Aristotle]